About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)
, i'm not a big fan of raising taxes, especially for small businesses. but the reality is we are in a financial crisis right now. and i read this over and over over the weekend. it is only a half a cent. they could have gone higher. i like the fact that this legislation is dedicated. it's not going into the general fund. our speaker spoke about -- you know, we are going to be getting a lot of parolees in this town. public safety is a big deal in my district. we have issues right now and we call the police and it takes a while for them to get there. and it's a big deal. it's just the reality of what's happening in the state of california today. so i will put a motion in support of this half cent sales tax. president o'brien: does anybody want to comment on that first or anybody want to take a vote on that? commissioner clyde? commissioner clyde: i would like to comment before we vote. i too will be supporting this because i do and long have supported dedicated funding for the social safety net. i think that we should have something -- i have children and i don't know how peopl
from now and folks are not going to want a car, that half a percent of a big ticket item is a real disadvantage. i would like to see this extended throughout the life of the increase. i just think that -- otherwise it could become a burden -- especially people who are buying large items. >> thank you, commissioner. i absolutely appreciate those comments and understand and will relay them to the mayor. thank you very much. president o'brien: i totally agree with everything that has been said. i think the mayor has managed to engender a lot of good faith and a lot of genuine desire to work with him in these tough budget times. you know, i never thought i would see the day where i'd be even for a second entertaining the idea of a tax. i thought i would never be one of those people. but it's easier when you're just walking down the street to say no taxes than when you're in a position that makes a difference. that said, it is pretty gentle. we are going from reduction -- we're still seeing a net reduction, which i think is really good. and the fact that this is an integral part of the
through the intersection of octavia and oak, and it had collided with a big rig. a few issues. one, we notice that there are no seat belts on shuttle buses. you have to imagine the full weight of a person being ejected from the shuttle bus then to be injured and killed by the of the vehicle. we may need a re-examination of the law that gives this. i think that seat safety devices should be required in the shuttle and in the public. it is something that if required for children on the shuttle buses, then there may be consideration that we do that four adults, too. just by the full magnitude of this accident in this area. octavia boulevard, as wonderful as it is, does, i think, have some unintended consequences. this would require an assessment, especially as traffic intersects with the arteries. there is the traffic that we directs itself on to the smaller streets and alleyways that tries to navigate around the arteries because of how congested those arteries are, as people are looking to come off of octavia boulevard or go on as they are approaching the highway. it is important that th
have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has helped us as we had too high air pollution in brussels as it was sanctioned by the european union that we really could stress on alternative mobility. we don't wait until european legislation or regulation coming up. we also have no brussels, no belgium, but european towns, towns in europe, trying to find one another and to press, to put pressure on mayors and regional ministers to commit themselves to invest in
. there is a little amplified sound and big amplified sound. i don't know how you would like to do with it but that is what she just expressed. >> we are looking if there is a way to separate out smaller operators? as far as i know, there are 10 major sightseeing companies in the city that have opened their buses. >> they seem to be multiplying. i see more of those double decker buses than i ever have. >> and even the small ones, i happen to live on a tourist site. those little small things, they are so loud. they are. the are really very intrusive. personally, i appreciate this because i have to year that same talk like 20 times a day. >> i have received lots of feedback from across the city. i would to speak to the alamo square neighborhood association. we got e-mail from all across the city where people made the same statements all over and over again. >> i like this legislation because where i live on 20, i hear them every day. sometimes, early saturday morning going up market street. i do like this. i have the same concerns. there are some smaller and smaller operators in the
right. president chiu, you looked so great, riding your bicycle up all of those hills. big city nights and those big city bills you were looking so right. making all of the budget come back, big city home nights and those big city bills and you were looking so right bring the budget bat b -- ack ♪ [bell] president chiu: thank you. next speaker is not. >> thank you -- next speakers. >> you may hear the seriousness in my voice because i am been victimized. many just give you one example over there. i want to make this clear to the city and county on record. i have been here in city hall for 20 years. i was upstairs in the media room before the earthquake, ok? now, i done made history. i made history, and now, they are trying to get rid of me. one thing is sure, i'm going to stand my ground. i am asking for a public hearing of what goes on in the press room. right now, i think you all know. the press room, that is part of city hall, and that is expensive real estate. back when real -- when willie brown was the mayor, he gave them the room. to see if there is quality. some got two realms
and also thought that these would be services that people depend on and that have a big impact and kind of the overall quality of our neighborhoods and the services that people see in the city. commissioner o'brien: commissioner kasselman? commissioner kasselman: i have a personal anecdote that is pertinent to this situation. about two weeks ago i had a friend walking in the mission district and attacked in a gang-related incident. a whole group of people that i know are now going to avoid the mission. i thank the mayor for addressing the situation. and having grown up in san francisco, it saddens me that now i know a bunch of people who won't go there. as a business owner, those businesses in that vicinity are going to lose, you know, 50 customers. if that happens elsewhere in the city, that could affect us one way or the other. i just wanted to sort of thank that from that perspective. >> thank you for that. i think that excellent reflects the mayor's thoughts on this as well that he's really interested in making sure that we have the services on the street that make san francisco our
. it is not about antagonizing tour bus operators. on the other hand, enforcement is a big issue, and a big expense. women go to the pleas to part with any kind of enforcement, they are busy with other things. the final analysis tends to be more important. we want that goal to be met as well. then we have the whole business of police work, transportation, a tour bus work for transportation. we do not want to have that happen for limited resources. but there are some things that we can do -- and i am not the expert on tour buses. in my experience, when those things are design-related, the shape of the streets, places where buses go, we tend to have more success and less need for enforcement. to give you a probably bad example, parks and buses is an issue. staging for a tour bus would be different for a shuttle that comes by the neighborhood. of course, we are serving a different constituency. the shuttle bus is serving the residents who are choosing to live in san francisco and work somewhere else and return to the city as soon as they can. we do not want to discourage that. with the tourists, it is
the other day that others get the same health insurance benefits i get. i don't know who is paying big premiums. i hope is being deducted from any and all of you that may benefit from that. thank you. i also picked up this charter amendment will affect the number of elected officials that are going to make decisions about pensions and i think electing is better than appointing. thank you. [tone] president chiu: thank you. are there any other members of the public who wish to speak at this public hearing? the public hearing is close. supervisor mar: there is always a challenge when there is not enough time for real dialogue. i appreciate the mayors efforts to put a pension reform package before us. i did want to allow someone from department of human resources to respond because i think many of the retirees -- it's great seeing many of the familiar faces from teachers to longtime public employees coming to speak before us with compelling arguments for why the pullout and this restructuring of the health system board. they make a good argument that it is anti-democratic -- anti- democrat
out more and more every day still about how hard it is to get a big size of a new -- a big size then you to succeed in that area. we have to have something special to get people in the area from all over the city to make a business succeed. for that, the support of the community-based organization like fillmore cbd is something that must -- that we have to be able to count on going forward. thank you. >> i just think the arts is so important in san francisco, and particularly the music. the music that combines us together, gives us souls, feeling, etc. i have been on the -- on teh -- on the s train. people wanted me to sing, and the driver said then we would have trumpets playing and no. i said that there seems to be an invisible sign around san francisco that says, "no dancing musicians allowed." i asked if he wants to kill all the artists. he says, "yes, but keep the athletes allied -- alive." i returned to that, and he said, "i did not say you should kill them. i was just agreeing with you." it is really like -- what? athleticism -- two weeks ago when you gave the park fundin
. this was the venue that we were looking for that was not too big, that was going to be over our head, and yet it was big enough for us to get into the field and moving forward. i understand there is a lot at stake. we want to do the right thing. >> commisioner joseph: best of luck. >> a couple of questions. jt's thing in the application, with respect to the gentleman from the security company. do you do security at other places or music venues? >> yes. i am ed thistle. i have been in this city since 1996 and i have managed a couple of clubs have worked in, eight or nine different clubs before starting yojimbo. >> you have other cts
to walk you through the specifics of the agreement. but the big picture is that it is a very close to cost neutral. as you point out, there is a slight difference, for exactly that reason, that we had initially anticipated that it would be a deferral of the wage. instead, it is a pension contribution pick up of an equivalent value, so there are some slight differences as to how it is implemented in terms of how we calculate the impact on overtime rates, premiums, that sort of thing. so there are some small differences, but they are administratively manageable. we will be working with the police and fire department to manage those changes. it is essentially equivalent to what we had some guy in the budget and will not affect our ability to continue forward. it will not affect the bottom line for the budget for this committee. and we are in balance. the valley of the concession is essentially equivalent to the mayor's budget. >> thank you. i would like to echo what was said from the mayor's budget office and acknowledge the men and women of local 798 and the san francisco fire department and
looking for that was not too big, that was going to be over our head, and yet it was big enough for us to get into the field and moving forward. i understand there is a lot at stake. we want to do the right thing. >> commisioner joseph: best of luck. >> a couple of questions. jt's thing in the application, with respect to the gentleman from the security company. do you do security at other places or music venues? >> yes. i am ed thistle. i have been in this city since 1996 and i have managed a couple of clubs have worked in, eight or nine different clubs before starting yojimbo. >> you have other clients in the city? >> we are at badlands, the starlight lounge, and other facilities. those are the primary nightclubs. >> i had a couple quick questions. the current venue as it exists, has it been troubled recently? >> shine is a small lounge and because of its location and demographic and its programming, we never had problems. we have no history of violence and no -- the only sound complete we had was six years ago. five years ago. even then it was a minor thing that was resolved. >> com
to study a that is a big mistake you are making by ignoring the great alterative to that destructive master plan appear in if the well-designed alternative was adopted, to have a new small car and a renewed library sooner, for less community disruption and considerably less cost. we persevere and not to win, but rather, not to lose open space, and glorious trees, and opportunity for a new small part, a famous softball playground, news of our icons, and confidence in our elected officials. who doe>> this is the third pare seen us lose. the third part has less open space than any other district in the city as far as i know. when i was the organizer, we have an open space funds committed for the proposition at the time. and the city delayed buying it until it went up and out it is a condo. there is a place dedicated on top of the broadway tunnel. that we supported. and one day, the supervisors saw it is said that it could be housing. housing could be built anywhere. this was a really important civic space, dislike triangle park. we lost that, too. i was down to a meeting where some people were
are some of the thoughts i had. supervisor elsbernd: thank you. let's step back and look at the big picture here. what you have in front of you, as has been discussed in public comment, a fully vetted, fully discussed piece of legislation that is brought to you through a collaborative process. six months of very intense work that at times got a bit heated, but it is something i am proud of and i think every member sponsored it is proud of and our partners in labor are proud of it. it is comprehensive in scope and is not just focus on the pension issue. it also focuses on the health care issue and it is not a proposal that ignores a thousand + of our employees. it gets savings as a result. it is not a proposal that unintentionally increases the retirement benefit of thousands of employees to happen to take a desman and our retirement. this is a well thought out and well lighted measure. the comptroller's office has finally put together some numbers that demonstrate what this ballot measure saves and what the public defender's ballot measure would save. i want to put those numbers in perspect
. if you are a businessman in san francisco, it is pretty clear that no matter how big of a heart you have, you cannot take care of everyone in every way you want to. it is kind of like the homeless problem. you take care of 100, there will be 200 more. you take care of 200, there will be 300 more. that is why a lot of my colleagues in different parts of the country actually congratulate me and say, "san francisco, you are doing a hell of a job solving problems for us in the east, the north, and the south. keep it up. you have such a big heart. we are glad we do not live in san francisco." my final piece of advice is no matter how much we want to help everyone, we have to be realistic. we cannot solve everyone's problems. it is better to teach them to solve them themselves. supervisor campos: thank you. next speaker please. >> good evening. i am from the golden gate restaurant association. i am here today to talk about what i think is a way forward that will address the issues that have been raised, without the negative economic impact we have also heard today. one of the things that peopl
by the membership, but getting to this tentative agreement is a big deal. so thank you to the leadership. supervisor mirkarimi: thank you. i think, probably on behalf of all of us, you speak for us in our gratitude for both local cahow 798 and the police -- for but local 798 and vdot poa. on nert, i support the resolution to make sure the funding to be not cut. i think nert is a dynamic program, one that deserves the funding, adequate funding. i think the proposal to cut it would subvert its potential in its major contribution. a few years ago when i was on the budget committee, and as i have been every year that i have been on the board, there had been a chance to cut nert then, and it was in its youngest days back then. there was resistance and then. but over the last quarter years, there has been great demonstration of how effective nert is. san francisco depends on this infrastructure for psittacine brigade, for any man-made and natural disaster. it is -- san francisco depends on this infrastructure for citizen brigade. so, enthusiastically, if it had not been mentioned, i would have motion did.
to $829 million. this is a big number, but of course that is if we do nothing. in response, the mayor has also proposed several financial strategies as part of that plan. those financial strategies include one piece of those financial strategies and revenue. those opposed to be about 12% of the solutions to that problem in the five-year financial plan. this proposal that is before you is an attempt to provide a solution to that piece of our problem. the rest of the solution was coming from the expenditure side which means reducing city costs and pension reform, which the mayor has been working very hard to implement. it means reducing the size of our work force and the cost of doing business as city departments and reductions to the amount that we're able to allocate to the contractors, a wide range of policy approach is designed to close that gap and bring this back into sound basic structural financial balance over the next five years. the approach that the mayor has tried to take is to spread those -- the burden of those solutions out over multiple participants in our cities government
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)